From Boltguns to Bolt Action

tanks-infantry-700As someone who has a vested interest in historical miniatures wargaming, I found this latest article over at the Warlord Games website to be a godsend. Many wargamers from my generation and later were lured into the hobby’s vile clutches through the fiendish manipulations of Games Workshop. While I’m not bashing anyone preferred form of miniature recreation, I do hope that younger wargamers look outside the product lines of GW and discover there’s plenty of other options out there–many of which can be enjoyed for far less than the usual arm-and-a-leg Games Workshop products tend to command.

Miniature wargaming isn’t exactly a booming hobby, so anything that help grow the base is a good measure by my reckoning. If you’re cool, you might even earn an invite to Hoffcon one day…

An Unexpected Hobbit

My The One Ring campaign celebrated its 1st anniversary at the beginning of the month. We lost one player due to real life obligations, but the remaining five—which is more than enough for TOR, or so I’ve learned—remain invested in our ongoing tale of fell doings, massing orcs, and mysterious happenstances that suggest larger forces have a hand in the fellowship’s doings.

Our latest adventure took us back over the Misty Mountains to Rhovanion in an attempt to diffuse a war that was brewing between the Beornings and the Woodmen. In preparation for the return to the Wild, I pulled my reprint of the original 1937 edition of The Hobbit off my shelf and started reading through it. It stirred up the urge to do some painting of my backlog of Middle-earth miniatures, this time focusing on some of the characters from The Hobbit.

I broke open my Escape from Goblin Town starter set, which had been languishing largely because of my less than enthusiastic attitude towards the movies, and got to scrubbing down the plastic sprue of Thorin Oakenshield and Company. Once it dried, it was time to get Bilbo from Games Workshop grey to something suitable for the game table.

bilboI have this to say about 25mm hobbits: they paint up quick! In an hour or so, I had Bilbo looking ready to leave Bag-End. A couple more hours were spent waiting for the base to dry, but then a fast drybrush and some static grass clumps and the burglar was ready to burgle something. Only thirteen more dwarves and a certain wandering wizard (or maybe two since I have a Radagast the Brown in that box too) and I’ll be well prepared for the next time I have an urge to take a stab at more faithfully recreating the events of the book than the movies did. All in all, I’m pretty chuffed how Bilbo turned out. I’ll never win a Golden Demon, but I’ve managed to develop painting chops sufficient enough that I’m not embarrassed to field one of my own paint job on the tabletop battlefield.